Stampa xilografica (ristampa) - Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) - "A white woman from Gionmachi, Kyoto" from "Famous women of the floating world" - Fine XX secolo

Descrizione
Stampa xilografica (ristampa) - Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) - "A white woman from Gionmachi, Kyoto" from "Famous women of the floating world" - Fine XX secolo
In buone condizioni, vedi descrizione

Woodblock print (reprint) - Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) - "A white woman from Gionmachi, Kyoto" from "Famous women of the floating world" - Late 20th century

Utagawa Kunisada,also known as Utagawa Toyokuni III, was the most popular, prolific and commercially successful designer of ukiyo-e woodblock prints in 19th-century Japan.In his own time,his reputation far exceeded that of his contemporaries,Hokusai,Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi.

At the end of the Edo period,Hiroshige,Kuniyoshi and Kunisada were the three best representatives of the Japanese color woodcut in Edo.
However,among European and American collectors of Japanese prints,beginning in the late 19th and early 20th century,all three of these artists were actually regarded as rather inferior to the greats of classical ukiyo-e,and therefore as having contributed considerably to the downfall of their art.

Beginning in the 1930s and 1970s,respectively,the works of Hiroshige and Kuniyoshi were submitted to a re-evaluation,and these two are now counted among the masters of their art.Thus,from Kunisada alone was withheld,for a long time,the acknowledgment which is due to him.

Dettagli lotto
Oggetto
Stampa xilografica (ristampa)
Materiale
Carta
Periodo
Fine XX secolo
Regione/ Paese d'origine
Giappone
Artista/creatore
Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865)
Attribuzione
Ristampa
Titolo dell'opera
"A white woman from Gionmachi, Kyoto" from "Famous women of the floating world"
Condizioni
In buone condizioni, vedi descrizione
Dimensioni
405×271×0 mm
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